Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS)

With the exception of a few small isolated patches of Purple Loosestrife on Round and Pike Lakes, the PLC is very fortunate that we do not have a problem with AIS.   Our biggest concern is for Eurasian Watermilfoil being introduced into our chain from surrounding lakes.  That is why it is so important for everyone to remove all aquatic plant materials from your boats and boating equipment when going from lake to lake. Below is a report from our AIS Committee Chairs.

AIS Report January 2017

As in past years, there is no problem with purple loosestrife at this time, the -20 temperature has taken care of that problem, at least for the next few months.

We placed 12 pots of beetle-infested plants at locations that in past years supported purple loosestrife (PL) growth, our one significant aquatic invasive species on the chain. This year it was found in the same areas where it was previously experienced. The main three areas are:

  • The marsh on private property behind the old Pine Forest Lodge area.
  •  The bay-like swamp on the northeast corner of Round Lake. 
  • The large stumpy bay north of the logging dam.

 

In addition, a significant population of PL was found just west of the trail leading back to Tucker Lake on the north end of Round Lake. By the time we located those plants we only had two pots left so we placed them there. We will target this area for more plants in 2017.

As in past years, the beetles were provided from the DNR through a program at McNaughton at no cost to the Association. We hope that will continue in 2017, as we see little evidence of a native population taking hold.

We physically dug-up plants and cut flowering heads where practical, prior to seed maturity. It should be noted that all our efforts will NOT eliminate the PL, but merely keep it at bay. The DNR tells us that is about the best we should expect.

Thanks to our PLCLA members who identified several PL plants near the Thorofare Bridge and reported and removed them. We again encourage anyone that is interested in doing their own spot checking to contact us to discuss how to collect the weeds and what to look for.

As for the other species of invasives that have been identified as a risk for our lakes (low probability), we continue to take samples of the aquatic plants and have NOT found any evidence they have been introduced to our chain.

Rick and Sandy Sironi – AIS Co-Chairs

AIS Report January 2018

During 2017 the blooming of Purple Loosestrife appeared to be down significantly. We were unable to acquire the beetles from the DNR as in other years, as McNaughton didn’t raise any. We hope they will be back in that business in 2018. We did communicate several times with the DNR regarding the availability, but they seemed to be having trouble getting the plants and the starter beetles. If the downturn in visible loosestrife was due to past distribution of beetles, the physical harvesting of plants before they went to seed, or simply the weather, we don’t know. We continued to physically remove plants as they were blooming, but we noted very little beetle damage so it makes me wonder how well the beetles are surviving the winter to produce a native population. Evaluating the effectiveness of past beetle efforts will be a recommended focus in 2018. As for the other species of invasives that have been identified as a risk for our lakes (low probability), we continue to take samples of the aquatic plants and have NOT found any evidence they have been introduced to our chain.

Rick and Sandy Sironi – AIS Co-Chairs

 

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